GliderPalooza 2013!

WELCOME EVERYBODY everyone, below is the current status of Glider Palooza for the 2013 Fall Season.

1. INTRODUCTION:

When? September-October 2013

Where? From Nova Scotia south to Georgia

What? 13-16 Slocum Gliders simultaneously deployed with a well-sampled ocean by satellites, CODAR, moorings to support an ensemble of ocean models

Who? Funding: MARACOOS, EPA, UDel, NASA, ONR, OTN, Private, Maine, VIMS, Skidaway, SECOORA

Participants/operators: Dalhousie, UMaine, WHOI, UMass, Rutgers, UDel, UMaryland, VIMS, NCState, Skidaway, Teledyne Webb

Why? Development of ecological observing networks is beyond the scope of any individual program requiring coordinated sampling at a minimum of a large marine ecosystem (LME).  For many ecosystems, the scale of the sampling will be larger than a LME especially in locations that show dramatic seasonal gradients in the ocean physical conditions that result in strongly seasonal migration patterns of higher order trophic levels.  This will necessarily require the development of a distributed ocean observing network capable of collecting regional data on the ocean state, the circulation patterns, and the subsurface conditions.  The scale of such a network will likely require activity of many disparate ocean observing programs all serving regional science/operational objectives, while simultaneously coordinating activity to serve large scale science/operational goals.

The highly distributed science communities spanning three Regional Associations of the US Integrated Ocean Observing System and eastern Canadian ocean observing efforts along the northeast American continent represents one of the most highly densest populated but distributed academic communities working in an oceanic region that experiences one of the largest seasonal gradients in ocean state (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll) in the world.  Not surprisingly these dramatic seasonal conditions are associated with some of the most migratory coastal fin and shellfish populations in the world.  The physical regulation of the timing and extent of these migrations is a central question to ecosystem-based managers.  Additionally observed large-scale changes associated with a changing climate might be shifting these migration patterns but to date these potential regime shifts remains unconstrained.

Gliderpalooza represents a grass-roots coordinated field demonstration of ocean observing technologies spanning the eastern seaboard of North America.  It grows out of the MARACOOS and Ocean Tracking Networks stated science priorities of developing the basis for ecosystem based management. The goal is to coordinate disparate ocean efforts, funded by disparate programs from a variety of agencies to demonstrate continental scale coordination of various ocean observing technologies to sample ecologically relevant scales.  The integrated data will be collected to serve a range of disparate science goals while also providing a regional data set for hindcast studies that can be used to improve physical, optical and ecological modeling/sampling efforts in the future.  The coordinated data from satellites, CODAR, moorings, drifters (via NMFS) and models will be focused on around the distributed deployment of a large number of Slocum gliders deployed during the Fall transition months of September and October. The timing is chosen to coincide with the peak months of animal migrations, the seasonal peak in tropical cyclone activity, the fall transition from the summer stratified ocean to well mixed winter conditions, and when undergraduates are beginning classes and can utilize ocean ocean observing data using NSF Ocean Observatory Initiative web-based learning tools to engage a new generation of oceanographers.  This educational goal was the original motivation of naming the effort Gliderpalooza. While the goal is to collect a coastal continental scale data set, it will simultaneously

1) provide a unique data set the modelers (real-time & hindcast) can use for years to come,

2) provide standardized dataset a over ecological scales and information on fish/mammal migrations

3) provide a 3-D snapshot of the MAB cold pool,

4) provide an extensive distributed network through the peak period of fall storms, demonstrating a community “surge” capacity,

5) provide one, of many demonstrations, of the potential national glider network and,

6) proof of data flow through IOOS to NDBC via DMAC and,

7) engage undergraduates in ocean observing efforts.

2. DEPLOYMENTS

While the Gliderpalooza is focused on a range of ocean technologies, the focused sampling will be coordinated around the community deployment of a fleet of Slocum gliders.  The current network of gliders committed to the proposed effort are:

Gliderpalooza Confirmed Gliders- 2013

 
Group

Glider

Instruments

Dock Server

Pilot

Deploy

Funding

1

Dalhousie

OTN200

CTD, Vemco, Optics, Optode?

Dalhousie

Dalhousie

3-Sep

OTN

2

OTN201

CTD, Vemco, Optics, Optode?

Dalhousie

Dalhousie

11-Sep

OTN

3

UMaine

Penobscot

CTD, ADCP, Optode, Optics, Vemco

Maine

Maine

2-Sep

Maine

4

WHOI

Saul

CTD, Turbulence, ADCP

WHOI

WHOI

10-Sep

ONR

5

UMass

Blue

CTD, Optode, Optics, Vemco

Rutgers

Rutgers

10-Sep

IOOS

6

Rutgers

RU28

CTD, Vemco, Optode, Optics

Rutgers

Rutgers

6-Sep

EPA

7

RU22

CTD, Optics, Vemco

Rutgers

Rutgers

9-Sep

IOOS

8

RU23

CTD, Optics, Vemco

Rutgers

Rutgers

13-Sep

IOOS

9

UDel

Otis

CTD, Vemco, Optode, Optics

Rutgers

Rutgers

11-Sep

Private

10

VIMS

Stewart

CTD, Optics, Optode

VIMS

VIMS

1-Oct

VIMS

11

NC State

Salacia

CTD, Vemco

Rutgers

NC State

17-Sep

NASA

12

Skidaway

Modena

CTD, Optics, Optode, Vemco

Skidaway

Skidaway

10-Sep

Skidaway

13

T. Webb

Darwin

CTD, Optics

T. Webb

T. Webb

12-Sep

Self

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2 Responses to GliderPalooza 2013!

  1. Jim Manning says:

    As of today, eight GPS drifters are deployed in MAB waters by various labs (UCONN, UMASS, Massasoit Community College, NOAA/NEFSC, and Sea Education Association) and a few more are scheduled in the next week including one by Rutgers alongside a glider. These are experimental drifters of standard shapes (both surface Davis-style and drogued units) but are made from a variety of materials and built by local students. Attempts to make a drifter that is somewhat bio-degradable and that will survive a few months on the shelf is the challenge. The tracks from the last seven days can be viewed both on the MARACOOS asset map and here.

  2. Pingback: UGA Skidaway Institute participates in Gliderpalooza 2013 | Skidaway Institute's Web log

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